Posts Tagged ‘William Cullen Bryant’

Group 2’s 6th and Final Blog Post

For your last blog post, pick one of the following options:

  1. Do you agree with Selden Whitcomb’s argument about the trajectory American literature and its treatment of nature by the turn of the 20th century? Why or why not? Use examples from any of our reading this semester to illustrate your points. Feel free to also bring in your knowledge of American literature from other classes or other sources.
  2. Write a response in which you assess Whitcomb’s analysis of either Hector St. John de Crevecoeur or William Cullen Bryant. In your response, you should both reference Whitcomb’s text and cite textual evidence from either “What is an American?” or Bryant’s poetry to support your claims.
  3. Which arguments made during the “Nature Faker Controversy” do you find most convincing? In your response, explain and defend your position. You may want to consider citing from last week’s Seton reading to further illustrate your points.
  4. What criteria does Mabel Osgood Wright propose for “good nature writing?” Do you agree with her criteria? What would you add to her list? In other words, how would you define “good nature writing?”

Remember, your posts should follow these requirements and guidelines:

  • Posts must be at least 300 words.
  • Posts must include at least one quote from the text. If you are writing about both texts, then you’ll need at least one quote from each as support.
  • Stay focused on answering the prompt question above. Avoid repeating the question and be as specific as possible in your answer.
  • Please note that you do not need to answer every “thinking question” I have posted (the questions after the bold directive). These are just options, so you could focus on one or a few. Avoid writing a response that looks like a Q & A or laundry list of answers to these smaller questions; make sure your response flows smoothly and has unity.
  • Your response should make an argument, not summarize the text.
  • Use specific moments from the text(s) to support and illustrate your argument.
  • Be sure to introduce, quote, cite, and comment on all quotes.
  • Don’t forget to tag your posts! Before adding a new tag, check the “choose from the most used tabs” menu to make sure it is not already listed.

Group 1, your blog response is due by class time on Tuesday, November 29. Group 2, blog comments are due by class time on Thursday, December 1.

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3. Analysis of Prairie Depiction in “A Tour on the Prairies” and “The Prairies”

The prairies, as depicted in literature, are a place of beauty and freedom; it is represented as a place of much potential in very distinct ways. Both Washington Irving’s A Tour on the Prairies and William Cullen Bryant’s poem The Prairies involve a great deal of praise surrounding the discovery and exploration of this new America. While both authors respect and admire the vastness and unfamiliarity of the prairies they do so in very distinct ways. Irving considers the prairies to be a place that is altogether foreign to him and offers him little comfort, “To one unaccustomed to it, there is something inexpressibly lonely in the solitude of a prairie. The loneliness of a forest seems nothing to it” (Irving 175). To Irving, the prairies represent a place that needs to be understood and in a sense conquered or it will overwhelm and consume a person. Whereas Bryant admires the power of the prairies and the lifestyle that it enforces upon its inhabitants he sees its strangeness as a virtue in the calm that it offers to its visitors, “A fresher wind sweeps by, and breaks my dream, And I am in the wilderness alone” (Bryant 4). Bryant sees the prairies as a place yet untouched by man and thus powerful in its ability to give peace, solitude, and steadfastness in a changing world.

Irving and Bryant also differ on the divinity found in nature. Irving considers the forest to be a much more holy and religious place, comparing it to his own religious experiences, “I was reminded of the effect of sunshine among the stained windows and clustering columns of a Gothic cathedral. Indeed there is a grandeur and solemnity in our spacious forests of the West, that awaken in me the same feeling I have experienced in those vast and venerable piles, and the sound of the wind sweeping through them, supplies occasionally the deep breathings of the organ” (Irving 41). This depiction of the forests offers more powerful imagery than any of the comparisons Irving makes of the prairies. Irving’s religious comparison to the forest shows that his heart lies with the forests, not the prairies. On the other end is Bryant’s reverence toward the prairie as a place of great serenity and divinity, “The hollow beating of his footstep seems A sacrilegious sound” (Bryant 2). Bryant regards the prairies as a place to be worshiped and praised, a place that is divine in its beauty. He feels that the virginal characteristic of the untouched prairie is important and ought to be respected.

Irving and Bryant offer two admiring views of the prairies. While they may differ in the author’s feeling toward the prairies, in comparison to the rest of nature, it is easy to see that each writer speaks with great esteem on the many unique qualities of the prairies. To Irving, the prairies represents a place of unfamiliarity and solitude; a place in which a man may lose himself in the strangeness of it all. In contrast, Bryant supports the view that the prairie is unlike any other part of nature and that it ought to be respected in its strange power. For the audience these two viewpoints offer diverse looks into, what was, a newly discovered part of America. Each author provides an unbiased opinion of what they have seen, leaving the reader to settle on an opinion themselves.

References

Irving, Washington. A Tour on the Prairies. Ch./Art: Excerpts p. 3-9, 30-34, 39-46, 50-54, 171-179. pub. University of Oklahoma Press 1956

Bryant, William Cullen. Yale Book of American Verse. Ch./Art: The Prairies p. 1-4 as reprinted. pub. Yale University Press; Bartleby.com 1912; 1999.

Instructions for Group 2’s First Blog Response

prairie in Effigy Mounds National Monument, Io...

Prairie in Effigy Mounds National Monument, Iowa. Image via Wikipedia

For this blog response, you have a few different writing options. Choose only ONE of these topics to write your response. Be sure to make it clear which question you chose in the subject line of your post. Remember, this blog response is for Group 2 only!

  1. Give an analysis of how wilderness functions in The Pioneers and/or A Tour on the Prairies. Some questions you may want to consider are: How is wilderness represented/valued (for example, as Eden, evil, sacred, pure, threatening, etc)? What are the “politics of wilderness” (Garrard 77) of the text; in other words, how is wilderness a site of gender, class, and/or racial struggle? Who or what is included/excluded in the text’s conception of wilderness? If you are writing about both texts, do they portray wilderness in similar or different ways, and what is at stake in these similarities/differences?
  2. Give an analysis of how the death of animal(s) is depicted in The Pioneers and/or A Tour on the Prairies. Some questions to consider include: What is the purpose of animal death in the text(s)? What emotions does it evoke in the reader and for what purpose? What attitude(s) toward animals/animal life is represented by the depiction of its death? How is this event used to reveal, promote, or condemn human qualities/actions? Is the animal death related to issues of identity, such as gender, race, class, and sexuality? To what extent does animal death validate or deny a commonality of experience shared by human and nonhuman entities? What kind of language is used to convey animal death, and what are the implications of that language? If you are writing about both texts, do they portray animal death in similar or different ways, and what is at stake in these similarities/differences?
  3. Give an analysis of how prairies are depicted in Washington Irving’s A Tour on the Prairies and either William Cullen Bryant’s poem “The Prairies” or the journals of Lewis & Clark. What do prairies represent to each of these writers? How does a change in literary form (from creative nonfiction to poem, for example) affect the representation of the prairie landscape? What feelings/thoughts does the prairie illicit? How do the writers depict changes to the prairie landscape as a result of westward expansion? How do issues of identity (like race, class, gender, religion, etc) influence their depictions of the prairie? What is at stake in the similarities/differences in these authors’ depictions of the prairies?

Remember, your posts should follow these requirements and guidelines:

  • Posts must be at least 300 words.
  • Posts must include at least one quote from the text. If you are writing about both texts, then you’ll need at least one quote from each as support.
  • Stay focused on answering the prompt question above. Avoid repeating the question and be as specific as possible in your answer.
  • Please note that you do not need to answer every “thinking question” I have posted (the questions after the bold directive). These are just options, so you could focus on one or a few. Avoid writing a response that looks like a Q & A or laundry list of answers to these smaller questions; make sure your response flows smoothly and has unity.
  • Your response should make an argument, not summarize the text.
  • Use specific moments from the text(s) to support and illustrate your argument.
  • Be sure to introduce, quote, cite, and comment on all quotes.
  • Don’t forget to tag your posts! Before adding a new tag, check the “choose from the most used tabs” menu to make sure it is not already listed.

Group 2, your blog response is due by class time on Tuesday, September 13.

Group 1, blog comments are due by class time on Thursday, September 15.